Beloved graduates, peers, friends, and community: It is with great sadness and tremendous gratitude that we share this with you: we will not be enrolling students for the Fall 2021 start... and likely not enrolling any future classes as well.We realize that many of you may be shocked, saddened, disappointed... and we are too. We’ve considered many, many avenues for keeping our doors open, but without sustainable enrollment numbers, we simply cannot continue. While demand for LMTs (nationwide and in WA) continues to grow, enrollment numbers continue to decline. This trend was underway when we first opened our doors nearly 10 years ago, and the pandemic has only widened that divide.We just graduated a lovely and talented group of grads. We are also firmly committed to completing classes (Q3 & Q4) for our final cohort with care, support, and professionalism. They will graduate and join the massage profession in March 2022.The silver lining in all of this, to be honest, is all of you — the students, teachers, and supportive community who have helped us (and each other) grow and learn and develop. We have treasured our time together and appreciate what you brought to us and the profession. You all are a gift, and we're grateful to know and grow alongside you.Remember, a Discoverypoint is neither the beginning nor the end, but a point along the way…part of the journey of our lives, our careers, and the stories we continue to weave. Thank you for joining us on this journey.💜 Pat, Lisa & Julie ... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago  ·  

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What Is The #Trager® Approach?The #TragerApproach is a #somaticeducation practice that helps people #experience themselves as #healthyandwhole. Developed by Dr. Milton Trager, it blends #touch, #movement, and #curiosity to #teach #clients to feel changes in their tissues and return to this feeling state to effect long-lasting changes.#dpsom #discoverypoint #seattle #massageschoolseattle #wfh ... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago  ·  

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#8 #Prepare the #InsuranceMost important, we are going to talk to you about insurance that you may need in your #business.#LiabilityinsuranceIn centers where skin treatment and touching client’s bodies is performed, professional and General Liability (#Malpractice) Insurance is critical. Hence, although it is not usual, there is a risk that the practitioner may cause damage to the #client. Many companies offer policy coverage for at least $2,000,000 limit per occurrence for less than $300 per year. Besides, a massage center must have a #CommercialInsurance with Civil Liability coverage to obtain the licenses.The most common coverage is the Civil Liability of Exploitation. This is responsible for the business activities. It also covers the damages that employees may cause when carrying out their work.The Employer’s Civil Liability covers the business owner if workers suffer injuries or death due to an accident at work.Multi-Risk InsuranceThis insurance covers the damages that can be caused by a fire or a flood in the #assets of the premises that are insured. It also includes glass breaks, moons, mirrors, etc. It is the insurance company that is responsible for the expenses that may involve the repair of the affected goods.The theft coverage is also #essential because in a massage center may have material quality and quite expensive.#dpsom #legalizeit #massagecareers #happyhealing #holistictherapy ... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago  ·  

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#7 Find a #StrategicLocation for #SuccessWhen choosing the location of the #massagecenter, it is best to separate yourself from the #competition. In big cities, there are already many massage centers, and you can find #pricewars and services. What you need to do is look for locations where there are almost no massage centers and little competition.To set up a massage center and have many #clients, you must try to locate it in a street where there is a lot of #movement. The massage rooms must be located in an area of the premises where the sound of the street is not heard. This condition is to avoid disturbing the #tranquility of the clients.A good idea is to locate the massage center in an area where there are people who work all day. In this way, receiving a massage when leaving work will be a perfect #opportunity for them.#dpsom #seattle #caphillseattle #massageschool #massagecareer ... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago  ·  

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#6 #Financing as a Licensed Massage TherapistThe initial #investment can be scary at first, but there are many ways to get financing for #massage therapist school and your practice. The primary source of financing to which #entrepreneurs go to set up a massage center is usually from #family and #friends. You can ask them to contribute #capital to your business. Also, they can help you later #promote your #business with #wordofmouth.On the other hand, the different sources of financing most used by small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) are:#Loans#Credit account#Leasing#Renting ... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago  ·  

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How to Choose Your Massage Table

 

The most important tool of any therapist’s kit is the massage table, and it’s one of the first investments you’ll make in your massage career. A table can be expensive, usually between $400 and $700—but it’s a carefully constructed piece of equipment that will last you many years

 

The American Massage Therapy Association outlines the following breakdown of why, exactly, a more expensive table makes sense, and that more money upfront will pay off in the long run while offering an improved experience for both you and your client:

 

“An established massage therapist averaging approximately 1,000 massages per year will have completed 5,000 massages in a five-year period. If the therapist paid $500 for her table, the cost per massage would average 10 cents.”

 

So what should you look for in a good table? Here are a few tips.

 

Width

 

In general, choosing the right massage table width is a matter of balancing the potential comfort of clients with your own. Narrower tables are easier on massage therapists in multiple ways. Not only are they lighter and therefore easy to transport and carry, but they also provide the least straining posture for the therapist. You need to be able to comfortably position your body during massage so that you can square your shoulders and hips to the client, pivoting at the waist to have your hands parallel to their spine. If the table is too wide, this can be a difficult posture to maintain and cause back strain for the therapist.

 

The industry standard for a massage table width is 30”, shorter therapists, under 5’4”, or those who need a lighter table for mobility might choose a 28” width, or a table with a narrow midsection that is the standard 30” at the ends. Tall therapists, meaning 5’11” or taller, or therapists who work with larger clients like athletes, might want to choose a table of a 32” width.

 

Weight Bearing

 

This is the most important aspect of your table—a well constructed table will not only last you for years, but it will be able to support anyone you’re treating! This is not only a safety issue, but even your most loyal client might not feel so forgiving when they’re laying naked on the floor with a bruised tailbone. Even if your table is labeled as bearing 300 pounds, there are many different ways that weight can be measured, so be sure you understand what you’re looking at.

 

Static WeightThe weight that one can place on a table without it breaking or collapsing.

Working WeightThis is the moving weight that a table can support. The Static Weight is placed gently on the table and not moved, but the Working Weight is a much better indicator of what it will be like with a real live person (because they move!).

Drop WeightTypically, this means the amount of weight that can be dropped from 6 inches above the table over a hinge or joint (the weakest points) but sometimes manufacturers will drop the weight over a leg or end rail (the strongest points), so be sure to ask.

 

Padding

 

Different tables are padded differently, usually for different techniques. Once again, its a matter of balancing client comfort and your massage technique—the firmer the table, the more able you will be to exert pressure on the client’s body, and the softer it is the more they will sink into the table. We think 3 inches of padding is a good average to look for, but the density of the padding may be more important than the amount.

 

Here are a few more quick tips to leave you with when considering the purchase of your first massage table.

 

Quick Tips:

 

-If you have any interest in pursuing Shiatsu massage, look for a table with collapsible legs so you can place it on the floor.

-If you are tall (5’10’ or more) and looking for a portable table, you may want to chose one that has two pins or screws in each leg to increase stability when set higher.

-Look for the letters “UL” on a table, which mean that it’s been through independent testing for weight bearing and other criteria.

-Look at the end-plate of the table, which should be slightly recessed, or advertised as having a ‘Reiki plate’, in order for therapists to position their feet or knees under it when sitting at the end.

-Make sure you get a cleaning solution that won’t break down or damage the surface of your table—you’ll be cleaning it often, and hopefully for many years

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